Is the Supertuck in Cycling a Dirty Move?

Lance Armstrong, one of the all-time greats at cycling, recently lashed out on NBCSN about one of the cyclists during his ride in Stage 3 of the Tour de France.

Julian Alaphilippe won Stage 3 of the Tour de France on July 8, but he did so by using an infamous move to stretch his lead in the final section of the stage – the supertuck.

Julian Alaphilippe uses the super tuck in Stage 3 of the Tour de France
https://www.businessinsider.com/lance-armstrong-tour-de-france-julian-alaphilippe-supertuck-2019-7

The supertuck involves the rider sitting on the top tube, the horizontal bar on the bicycle that connects the two main vertical bars together (The seat tube and fork). The cyclist must lean forward, with his/her head sticking out in front of the handlebars.

Like it did July 8 for Julian Alaphilippe, the supertuck often helps the cyclist speed down hills because of its slick aerodynamics.

But it’s also extremely dangerous. The cyclist has to lean forward in an extremely unnatural position, flying down hills at roaring speeds. That’s where Lance Armstrong comes in.

Armstrong was not happy with Alaphilippe’s choice of the super tuck. He stated on NBCSN that “Not only did he supertuck, but he was looking back at the chasers while he was in the supertuck, which is next-level stuff. My fear though is that every Tom, Dick, and Harry on a group ride, here or anywhere around the world, is going to be trying the supertuck. I have to close my eyes.”

That’s a valid point, it can be dangerous, but that’s not a good enough reason for me to ban the supertuck in all of cycling, like some people want. These are professional cyclists, not middle schoolers riding down tall mountains for fun.

The fact is that kids at home may try the supertuck, and may fall and injure themselves. I don’t think we can stop them from doing that. Ideally they fail, and learn from their mistakes. Failure is necessary, as it helps us learn and brings us closer to success.

Advancement and innovation are parts of all sports, and it is best to adapt to those advancements so one can succeed. While the supertuck may be dangerous, it’s not dirty.

Comment you opinion on this whole situation, and click the follow button either in the top right (desktops) or bottom right (phones). Peace out!

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Sources

https://www.cyclingweekly.com/news/racing/tour-de-france/super-tuck-ban-enforced-pro-peloton-riders-say-388226

https://www.roadbikerider.com/super-tuck-is-not-so-super-d2/

https://www.businessinsider.co.za/lance-armstrong-tour-de-france-julian-alaphilippe-supertuck-2019-7

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3 thoughts on “Is the Supertuck in Cycling a Dirty Move?

  1. First of all, people should not be taking biking advice or rules from Lance Armstrong because he was caught with drugs to enhance his races and got 7 Tour de France titles taken away from him. Anyway, the supertuck should definitely be allowed. It doesn’t matter how dangerous it is. This is like saying boxers should no longer try to knock out their opponent because it is to dangerous. No it is part of the sport. This is the same thing, cyclists should be able to bike however they want no matter the danger, they are professionals and can endanger themselves however they please. Sorry this was so long🤷‍♀️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s all good Holly! Thanks for commenting your thoughts!

      Like

  2. If you do something that stupid, and you injure yourself, you deserve it.

    Like

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